Making a Living and Just Getting By

HIGH INCOME/MOSCOW.
The Rylovs, entrepreneurs with a student daughter, spend 2,500-2,800 rubles a week [$110] on food.

Alexander Rylov: "We don't spend much on food and buy almost no alcohol. I trained as a doctor and try to make sure my family eats nutritiously. We eat a lot of dairy products, so we have really noticed the price hikes. For example, I used to buy cheese at 110 to 125 rubles per kilo [$5], and now it costs 180 to 200 rubles [$8]. We don't want to exclude dairy products but may have to give up cheese and imported yogurt."

Russian spending:
60 percent - rough spending on foodstuffs and clothes out of Russians' overall expenses in 2001
35 percent - spending on foodstuffs and clothes out of Russians' expenses in 2010.
Source: Troika Dialog

Photograph and text are provided as a courtesy of Ogoniok Magazine

MEDIUM INCOME/PETROPAVLOVSK, RUSSIA'S FAR EAST.

Valery Korolkov, a driver, and wife Olga have six children, and grandchildren. Their budget is 8,000 rubles ($320). They will not cut spending, but will try to supplement their income.

Olga Korolkova: "We grow vegetables at our dacha. If it was not for our homemade preserves, our budget would have collapsed. The price hikes have been the highest for sugar, bread and flour, and we like homemade pastries. We have already cut down on fruit. If there are further increases, we'll try to find other sources of income."

Russian spending:
60 percent - rough spending on foodstuffs and clothes out of Russians' overall expenses in 2001
35 percent - spending on foodstuffs and clothes out of Russians' expenses in 2010.
Source: Troika Dialog

LOW INCOME/KRASNOGORSK, THE MOSCOW REGION.

Vadim Belov is an electrician and his wife, Galina, works at a bakery. They spend 300-500 rubles [around $20] a week on food. They will now be unable to afford fruit, will have to buy less clothing and cut back on mobile phonecalls.

Galina Belova: "I went to buy a bottle of cooking oil, two cartons of milk and some bread. I expected the total to be 100 rubles [$4], so that is how much I took. Then I saw the price for oil had increased to 67 rubles, from 47. I ended up with a bottle of oil, one carton of milk and half a loaf."

Russian spending:
60 percent - rough spending on foodstuffs and clothes out of Russians' overall expenses in 2001
35 percent - spending on foodstuffs and clothes out of Russians' expenses in 2010.
Source: Troika Dialog

Photograph and text are provided as a courtesy of Ogoniok Magazine

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