‘Grand Duke’ with his eyes on the Kremlin

Dmitry Medvedev’s tenure in the Kremlin could be cut short by a legal suit brought by a man claiming to be the heir to the throne.

Valery Kubarev wants to be registered as a resident of Moscow’s Kremlin, and wants Russia’s government to be replaced by an assembly of princes under the control of a Gran d Duke.

And he feels he would be the ideal Grand Duke in the event that the Moscow Arbitration Court finds in his favour on October 18.

Kubarev told gzt.ru that his organisation, the Princes Foundation, comprises the “descendants of the princes of Holy Russia” and has been promoting national and religious harmony since its creation in 2009.

He also argues that he is a direct descendant of the Rurik dynasty, which supplied Moscow with its Grand Dukes from Daniel in 1261 until Ivan the Terrible, who was made Russia’s first tsar in 1547.

Kubarev is confident that he is part of the true royal line, pointing out that Spain recognises the scions of the Rurik dynasty just as it does the descendants of the Romanovs.

“The authorities use the Kremlin as their property,” he told gzt.ru. “They sit under the Rurik arms and project our wealth and grandeur.

“But we have not delegated this wealth and grandeur to anyone. What they are doing is called raider seizure.”

Kubarev says he has no problem with the work of a democratically elected parliament and president in Russia.

However, he says that royalty is appointed by God, so outranks any elected assembly and the president must be subordinate to an assembly of princes.
“The assembly, headed by the Grand Duke, should be the supreme legislative authority,” says Kubarev.

The next step is a court hearing in Moscow in October. However, Kubarev is aware that even the divine right of princes may not sway a Russian state court, and is therefore planning to refer the matter to the European Court of Human Rights.

“The aristocrats of Europe support us,” Kubarev claimed. “We have no doubt that the Russian Federation will pay us a penalty and apologise.”

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