Berezovsky says that he will continue financing Russian nonprofit groups from abroad

The exiled Russian businessman Boris Berezovsky, who resides in London, said the new law requiring that nonprofit organizations in Russia be given the status of foreign agents, will not tell on his projects in Russia, the daily Izvestia writes on Wednesday.

"I do not disclose information about my beneficiaries in Russia, because all of my investments in Russia and elsewhere are being monitored by the Federal Security Service," Berezovsky was quoted as saying.

The law on nongovernmental organizations, recently passed in Russia, will not change anything, Berezovsky said.

"I will continue supporting those I find necessary. A scheme I have devised keeps the origin of this money unidentified by Russian special services," the oligarch said.

Berezovsky also said that laws are created "for smart people to find loopholes in them and dodge compliance legally."

"I have been anticipating such a turn of events for a long time and I new that a law of this kind would be enforced after all. I don't know if many have their own schemes to go beyond the law, but I do transfer money to Russia absolutely legally," he said.

"The Russian authorities have been devising unconstitutional and undemocratic laws lately," he added.

Berezovsky said Left Front leader Sergei Udaltsov is an appealing figure, and he criticized opposition campaigner and blogger Alexei Navalny.

"I don't sponsor opposition groups. I share Udaltsov's position. Regarding Navalny, he is becoming a puppet and his being an Aeroflot director reveals his readiness for compromise," the oligarch said.

Navalny is a "temporary idol," particularly popular among "girls aged between 40 and 50." "He is no fighter," Berezovsky said.

"He is a good politician of the moment, but unfortunately, he is poorly educated and does not know Russian history, even modern Russian history," he said.

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