Margelov regards Romney's tough statements on Russia election rhetoric

Mitt Romney, the U.S. Republican Party presidential candidate, despite his promises to toughen Washington's attitude to Moscow in the event of his election, will be forced to maintain normal relations with Russia, head of the Federation Council International Affairs' Committee Mikhail Margelov believes.

"The Republican Party platform says that despite the Magnitsky Act, Russia deserves the normalization of trade relations and that the U.S. and Russia have common interests in advancing trade and resisting terrorism and nuclear nonproliferation," Margelov said to Interfax on Friday.

"The circumstances are likely to be such that Romney, if he becomes president, will have to have to focus on these very aspects of the foreign policy program," he added.

Margelov reminded Interfax that the Republican Party platform was approved for four years but in his opinion, "it clearly contains an election element, primarily, in the part dedicated to relations with Russia."

He noted that in the platform Russia is listed among rivals of the United States, but described as the main geopolitical enemy. He added that Russia is mentioned in the same group as North Korea, Iran and China.

In addition, Republicans are urging Moscow to change its attitude to the opposition, civil society and "tyrants in the Middle East."

"Will Romney, if he becomes president, strictly follow these provisions of the platform? In rhetoric - yes, as any Republican should, in practice - hardly because election speeches are one thing and acting in changing circumstances - absolutely other," Margelov said.

In his opinion, relations between the United States and Russia are influenced by the positions of their leaders but political necessity always takes the upper hand. "The international influence of these countries is too great and it is impossible for them to do without each other on the global agenda," the Senator concluded.

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