Vice-Speaker Zheleznyak lists conditions on which Russia may not ban U.S. adoptions

State Duma Vice-Speaker Sergei Zheleznyak, a father of four children, says he is ready to adopt an orphan and does not fear being added to the "Magnitsky List" amongst deputies who have voted for the Dima Yakovlev Law.

"Attention lobbyists of exports of Russian children: I am a father of four wonderful children, I have no property abroad and I am not eager to go there, so I am not afraid of horror stories about possible bans," he posted on Facebook on Saturday night.

"We will raise our children and gladly adopt orphans, just like Sergei Neverov and my other comrades have done," he wrote.

Zheleznyak listed conditions on which Russia might not quit the adoptions agreement with the United States.

"If the U.S. side wishes to keep this agreement valid, it should give us guarantees of unhampered access to adopted children and possibility of defense of their rights in court, up to the deprivation of unscrupulous adoptive parents of their custody rights, as well as real cooperation in the prosecution of those who tortured and killed our children in the United States within the year, which takes the unilateral secession from an international treaty," the vice-speaker said.

"The agreement must be disavowed unless that is done," he stressed.

"We should not think about the U.S. interests but give a family to a parentless child and enable adoptive parents in Russia to get a child without tiring experience or bribes," he said.

The State Duma adopted on Friday the Dima Yakovlev Law retaliating against the U.S. Magnitsky Act and banning U.S. adoptions of Russian children.

A collection of signatures to a petition to the U.S. president posted on the White House website started on Friday evening. The petition aims to include Russian deputies, who have voted for the law, to the Magnitsky List that imposes visa restrictions against a number of Russians. The necessary number of signatures has been collected.

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