Exposed: A Briton’s love for art in Moscow

Exposed’s two-storey space opens this week in a factory building close to Shabolovskaya metro station. Source: Courtesy of 'Exposed'

Exposed’s two-storey space opens this week in a factory building close to Shabolovskaya metro station. Source: Courtesy of 'Exposed'

Businessman opens new cultural space in the Russian capital.

Ken Climie first visited Russia 23 years ago as a consultant working to improve the supply of bread to Moscow. Now the British businessman wants to help feed the capital’s soul with a new cultural centre called Exposed.

Moscow has been transformed in the intervening years into a bright and modern city with a wide range of arts ventures. Climie maintained his ties to the city and realised he wanted to do something in the cultural sphere too.

“I have long had a passion for beautiful things and for traveling in very unusual parts of the world,” he says.

He had considered other options in Europe, Asia and Latin America, but kept coming back to Moscow. Climie explains: “Partly because I loved the city, partly because the long cultural heritage in Russia was attractive. Partly because of the lively contemporary art scene in Moscow.”

Exposed’s two-storey space opens this week in a factory building close to Shabolovskaya metro station, not far from central Moscow. Portraits of Africans shot by photographer John Kenny greet visitors to the gallery: the huge faces on black and white backgrounds look stately and exciting.

John Kenny's 'Facing Africa' photo exhibition. Source: Courtesy of 'Exposed'

Besides the art gallery with photos, paintings and sculptures, there is a photo studio, café and library at the art centre. Climie’s plan was to create a combination of an art gallery, shop, exhibition space, and a venue for classical and jazz concerts, as well as talks and discussions.

“I wanted to be able to display art from many different cultures and geographies. I wanted to be able to provide beautiful portraits and images that people probably dream of, as well as a place for music, lectures, talks and seminars on a variety of topics,” says Climie.

Exposed has signed a partnership with one of Russia’s biggest publishing houses, Eksmo, to host meetings with writers. One of Eksmo's authors, the popular writer Oleg Roj, said that the art centre was perfect for informal contact with readers in contrast to official book signings that usually take place in big book stores.

Climie has plans to open similar art spaces in Buenos Aires, Argentina, and Berlin, Germany.

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