Number of the week: How many Russians see the fall of the USSR as a tragedy?

41% of Russians see the putsch of August 1991, which ended with the collapse of the USSR, as a tragic event for the country, reports independent Russian poll agency Levada Center.The figure is 14% more than in 1994, when the majority characterized the coup as “just a fight for power” Today only 10% of those interviewed see it as a victory for democracy37% of modern Russians think the country started to go the wrong way in 1991.In this photo a monument to Felix Dzerzhinsky, chairman of the All-Russian Extraordinary Committee (VChK) - a precursor to the KGB - is seen being dismantled during a rally in Lubyanka Square on the night from August 22 to 23, 1991. Photo by TASS / Andrei Solovyov; Gennady KhamelyaninRead more: 25 years of post-Soviet Russia: How far has the country come?

41% of Russians see the putsch of August 1991, which ended with the collapse of the USSR, as a tragic event for the country, reports independent Russian poll agency Levada Center.The figure is 14% more than in 1994, when the majority characterized the coup as “just a fight for power” Today only 10% of those interviewed see it as a victory for democracy37% of modern Russians think the country started to go the wrong way in 1991.In this photo a monument to Felix Dzerzhinsky, chairman of the All-Russian Extraordinary Committee (VChK) - a precursor to the KGB - is seen being dismantled during a rally in Lubyanka Square on the night from August 22 to 23, 1991. Photo by TASS / Andrei Solovyov; Gennady KhamelyaninRead more: 25 years of post-Soviet Russia: How far has the country come?

Anna Sorokina, Ilya Krol
Only 1 in 10 sees the coup that destroyed the Soviet Union as positive

41% of Russians see the putsch of August 1991, which ended with the collapse of the USSR, as a tragic event for the country, reports independent Russian poll agency Levada Center.

The figure is 14% more than in 1994, when the majority characterized the coup as “just a fight for power” 

Today only 10% of those interviewed see it as a victory for democracy

37% of modern Russians think the country started to go the wrong way in 1991.

In this photo a monument to Felix Dzerzhinsky, chairman of the All-Russian Extraordinary Committee (VChK) - a precursor to the KGB - is seen being dismantled during a rally in Lubyanka Square on the night from August 22 to 23, 1991. Photo by TASS / Andrei Solovyov; Gennady Khamelyanin

Read more: 25 years of post-Soviet Russia: How far has the country come?

All rights reserved by Rossiyskaya Gazeta.

More exciting stories and videos on Russia Beyond's Facebook page

This website uses cookies. Click here to find out more.

Accept cookies