Kruzenstern barque, ploughing through the seas and times

The Kruzenshtern or Krusenstern is a Russian four masted barque and tall ship that was built in 1926 in Bremerhaven-Wesermünde, Germany, as shipyard number "S408" under the name Padua (named after the eponymous Italian city). She was given to the USSR in 1946 as war reparation and renamed after the early 19th century Baltic German explorer in Russian service, Adam Johann Krusenstern (1770-1846). On April 19 it will leave the Kaliningrad's harbour to visit Klaipeda (Lithuania), then Hamburg and Rouen in the end.
On January 12, 1946 she was given to the USSR to be integrated into the Soviet Baltic Fleet. She was moored in Kronstadt harbour until 1961 where she underwent major repairs and a refit (e. g. the installation of her first engines) for her missions under leadership of the Hydrographic Department of the Soviet Navy.
From 1961 to 1965 the ship performed many hydrographic and oceanographical surveys for the Academy of Sciences of the USSR in the Atlantic ocean, the Caribbean, and Mediterranean, and was used as a training vessel for naval cadets.
From 1961 to 1965 the ship performed many hydrographic and oceanographical surveys for the Academy of Sciences of the USSR in the Atlantic ocean, the Caribbean, and Mediterranean, and was used as a training vessel for naval cadets.
From 1968-72 a major modernisation took place, installing her current set of engines and applying her current hull paint - black with a wide white stripe including black 'portholes' which from a distance look just like real gunports. The painting (by the Soviet owners) on the side suggests the presence of cannons, but that is just an illusion.
In January 1981 the Kruzenshtern transferred to the "Estonian Fisheries Industry" at Tallinn and in 1991 she became part of the "State Baltic Academy of the Fisheries" fleet with her new home port in Kaliningrad.
The Kruzenshtern takes part in many international regattas. After the fall of the USSR funding became a problem, so passengers are taken aboard for that purpose.
In 1995/96 she made a trip around the world in the trail of her namesake. She again circumnavigated the globe in 2005-06 to commemorate the 200th anniversary of Krustenstern's circumnavigation.
On 23 June 2009  while enroute to the Charleston,  South Carolina Harborfest, the ship's foremast  was damaged in a  storm off of Bermuda when the sail backed and snapped the mast.
"Kruzenshtern" does not have luxury and comfort which can be provided by modern cruise liners. But this fact does not stop devoted friends of "Kruzenshtern" from many countries all over the world who has been spending their holidays on its board for many years.
Aboard the Kruzenshtern you are offered not only sailing to observe sea beauties. You can become a voluntary "full staff" crew member and you will be able to fulfill all the sailor’s duties.
Some of trainees prefer mast climbing, others like standing at the wheal, third ones dream about cleaning the deck.
After the Sedov, another former German ship, she is the largest traditional sailing vessel still in operation.

All rights reserved by Rossiyskaya Gazeta.

More exciting stories and videos on Russia Beyond's Facebook page

This website uses cookies. Click here to find out more.

Accept cookies