Russia's Far East: Final resting place of North Korean fishing boats

Russian border guards detain them, but almost instantly send them back to their homeland. It’s harder to transport their boats and costlier, too. That is why their fishing boats and schooners pass the rest of their days on Russian shores.

Russian border guards detain them, but almost instantly send them back to their homeland. It’s harder to transport their boats and costlier, too. That is why their fishing boats and schooners pass the rest of their days on Russian shores.

Yuri Smityuk
Vladivostok, Russia’s largest port city, is located 9,500 kilometers (5,903 miles) to the east of Moscow. Within close proximity to it is the 17-km-long (10.5-mile) border along the Tumen River separating Russia from North Korea. North Korean fish poachers often end up on Russian shores due to storms and fog. This coastal beach is home to the final resting area of many North Korean boats…

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