The Winter Palace as the Russian tsars saw it

Grand Duchess Maria Nikolaevna’s great cabinet

Grand Duchess Maria Nikolaevna’s great cabinet

Eduard Gau
Emperor Nikolai I decreed that Russian artist Eduard Gau start painting watercolors of the Winter Palace’s interior (the Russian Empire's official residence in the 18th-20th centuries). He illustrated in his watercolor paintings all of the splendor, brilliance, and opulence of the imperial palace’s interior.

The Winter Palace, the Russian Empire's official residence in the 18th-20th centuries. Located in the heart of Saint Petersburg, this former imperial palace is now part of the Hermitage State Museum's complex. / Empress Maria Alexandrovna’s Crimson Cabinet
The current building was constructed between 1754—1762 by the Italian architect Francesco Bartolomeo. Rastrelli in Elizabethan Baroque style. This term describes the Russian Baroque architectural style under Empress Elizabeth Petrovna (1741-61) that includes elements of French Rococo in interiors. / Concert Hall
Russian artist Eduard Gau illustrated in his watercolor paintings all of the splendor, brilliance, and opulence of the imperial palace’s interior. / The Great (Nicholas) Hall
Starting in the 1850s, by order of Emperor Nikolai I, Gau started painting watercolors of the Winter Palace’s interior. / Fifth hall of the Military Gallery
Eduard Petrovich Gau (1807  —1887) was a master of “architectural watercolors”. He invariably paid special attention to objects’ perspectives. His artistic “interior portraits” are almost as accurate as a photograph: he painted extraordinarily minute details.  / Dressing Room
It is well known that in the 1850s, Eduard Gau received an order from Emperor Nikolai I to paint the palace interiors at Tsarskoye Selo, Peterhof, and the Winter Palace. Later (in the 1860 and 1870, during the reign of Alexander II), Gau created images of the Nikolayevsky and Mikhailovsky Palaces in Saint Petersburg as well as the Grand Kremlin Palace (the Emperor’s official residence in Moscow). / Empress Maria Fedorovna’s Cabinet
The Winter Palace illustrated in Gau's paintings was used as the official winter residence of Russian emperors from the time of its completion in 1762 through 1904. /  Alexander Hall
In 1904, Nikolai II (the last Russian emperor) transferred the permanent residence to Alexandrovsky Palace in Tsarskoye Selo (the royal family's estate located near the city of Pushkin, 25 kilometers from Saint Petersburg). / Grand Duchesses’ Gothic salon
From October 1915 to November 1917, a hospital functioned in the Winter Palace. In addition, between June and November 1917, the palace was the location for the Provisional Government which removed the emperor from power by its decree in February of 1917. Then in October 1918, the Provisional Government was overthrown and the era of the Soviet Union began. / Salon in Rococo style with cupids
In January 1920, the State Museum of Revolution was opened in the Winter Palace. It shared the building with the State Hermitage right up until 1941. / Armorial Hall
Currently, the Winter Palace and the Hermitage Museum are one of the most popular attractions for tourists from around the world. / Empress Maria Alexandrovna’s boudoir
Grand Duchess Maria Alexandrovna’s boudoir
Emperor Alexander II’s library
Empress Alexandra Feodorovna’s bedroom
Empress Alexandra Feodorovna’s dressing room
Empress Alexandra Feodorovna’s White Salon
First hall of the Military Gallery
Grand Duchess Maria Alexandrovna’s cabinet
Grand Duchess Maria Alexandrovna’s bedroom
Grand Duchess Maria Nikolaevna’s great cabinet

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