A long-gone Moscow: Russia's capital through artists' paintings

Kazimir Malevich, the founder of suprematism and creator of the famous painting "The Black Square", moved to Moscow with his wife and kids after his mother did. The move, however, did not bring family bliss. His wife soon took the kids and left the city before the couple eventually divorced. Kazimir Malevich is known more by his descendants for being the creator of the Black and Red Squares, the Black Circle, and "The Charge of the Red Cavalry". Nevertheless, he also painted many lesser known, classical works. / View of Moscow Myasnitsky District, Kazemir Malevich, 1913

Kazimir Malevich, the founder of suprematism and creator of the famous painting "The Black Square", moved to Moscow with his wife and kids after his mother did. The move, however, did not bring family bliss. His wife soon took the kids and left the city before the couple eventually divorced. Kazimir Malevich is known more by his descendants for being the creator of the Black and Red Squares, the Black Circle, and "The Charge of the Red Cavalry". Nevertheless, he also painted many lesser known, classical works. / View of Moscow Myasnitsky District, Kazemir Malevich, 1913

Kazemir Malevich
Moscow has always been a source of inspiration for artists thanks to the beauty of its churches, its historic buildings, wide streets, and hidden courtyards. Artists captured all of this in their work, each in their own way, but always gladly and willingly.
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