Ideals of feminine beauty at the beginning of the Soviet era

Alexander SamokhvalovThe Russian Museum in St. Petersburg is hosting a Samokhvalov exhibition until the end of March 2015. The retrospective includes 250 works from his early architectural drawings all the way up to 1967’s Appassionata (Builders of Communism) — his last great work, which sums up his entire output. Perhaps the artist contemplated something as such, otherwise why would he have inserted into the hoi polloi in the background some his characters from the golden age of the 1930s — that self-same Girl in a T-shirt? // Girl in a T-shirt

Alexander SamokhvalovThe Russian Museum in St. Petersburg is hosting a Samokhvalov exhibition until the end of March 2015. The retrospective includes 250 works from his early architectural drawings all the way up to 1967’s Appassionata (Builders of Communism) — his last great work, which sums up his entire output. Perhaps the artist contemplated something as such, otherwise why would he have inserted into the hoi polloi in the background some his characters from the golden age of the 1930s — that self-same Girl in a T-shirt? // Girl in a T-shirt

Alexander Samokhvalov
Today, the debate about the female body, the “model” measurements and the media's objectivation of women is more heated than ever. Back in the 1930s and 40s, meanwhile, the feminine ideal was toned and athletic, not thin; well-groomed, but not too much; working, but still committed to family values. How do these parameters compare with today’s?