Samara metro: One of Russia's safest

The Samara metro, like most other metros in Russia, operates at a loss. The cost of transporting a passenger is 38 rubles, while one ride costs 20 rubles.

The Samara metro, like most other metros in Russia, operates at a loss. The cost of transporting a passenger is 38 rubles, while one ride costs 20 rubles.

Slava Stepanov / GELIO
The Samara underground system was opened in 1987, becoming the fifth metro in Russia and the twelfth in the Soviet Union.

The Samara underground system was opened in 1987, becoming the fifth metro in Russia and the twelfth in the Soviet Union. Distance between Moscow and Samara is 542 miles or 872.08 kilometers.
The metro currently has one line connecting the industrial outskirts with the center. The Samara Metro has some of the safest security measures. If anything were to go wrong here, a great series of events would have to happen first.
Approximately 53,500 people ride the Samara metro every day. That accounts for 9.4% of the city's commutes.
Rossiiskaya Station is the Samara metro's newest addition. It was opened to passengers on December 26, 2008. Construction of the site took 15 years due to a lack of funding.
The minimum interval between trains on the Samara metro is 7 minutes, compared to a minute and a half on the Moscow metro.
Moskovskaya Station was built over 9 years and opened on December 27, 2002.
Of the 9 stations in the Samara metro, only 3 are equipped with escalators.
Gagarinskaya Station, named after cosmonaut Yury Gagarin, was designed in a space theme: the dark blue mosaics on the wall depict a starry sky, while the columns are shaped like stars.
Pobeda Station, or Victory Station , is deservedly considered the Samara metro's most beautiful station. It's designed in honor of the Soviet people's victory in World War II.
Yunogorodok Station is an open above-ground station, the only one in the Samara metro network.
The total length of all tunnels in usage amounts to 20.3 kilometers. The average speed of trains on the route is 39 km/hr (24.2 mph).
The Samara metro, like most other metros in Russia, operates at a loss. The cost of transporting a passenger is 38 rubles, while one ride costs 20 rubles.

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