The spirit of the Russian nobility lives on at Muranovo Estate

Most of them are memorial and once belonged to the owners of the estate and their relatives. It contains one of the richest collections of furniture in Russia, a great variety of art materials, and a large memorial library with more than 90,000 books.

Most of them are memorial and once belonged to the owners of the estate and their relatives. It contains one of the richest collections of furniture in Russia, a great variety of art materials, and a large memorial library with more than 90,000 books.

Vadim Razumov
Photo journey admiring the interiors of the “estate of two poets”.

Welcome to Muranovo Estate, a large noble dwelling near Moscow that houses the belongings of Russian poet Fyodor Tyutchev and preserves the spirit of the Russian nobility.
The poet and diplomat Fyodor Tyutchev is perhaps most famous for his short poem that asks “Who would grasp Russia with the mind?”, and suggests that “Her soul is of a special kind,/ By faith alone appreciated.” / Fyodor Tyutchev pictured on an oval portrait in the center.
The estate was founded in 1816 and since then has belonged to four families, including the relatives of Russian poets Fyodor Tyutchev and Yevgeny Baratynsky.
The museum collection includes more than 28,000 exhibits.
In August 1920, the estate became the Tyutchev Museum, founded by the poet’s grandson Nikolai Tyutchev.
In 1873, after the death of Fyodor Tyutchev, his belongings and archives were brought to Muranovo by his son. The poet’s massive table with green tabletop was also brought here.
Among the different estates outside Moscow, Muranovo holds a special place. Often described as a “house of poets”, it recalls the vivid social and literary life of 19th-century Russia.
Most of them are memorial and once belonged to the owners of the estate and their relatives. It contains one of the richest collections of furniture in Russia, a great variety of art materials, and a large memorial library with more than 90,000 books.
Fyodor Tyutchev died in 1873 at Tsarskoye Selo Estate (24 km from St. Petersburg). The green bed, on which he spent the last minutes of his life, was brought to Muranovo Estate and now is situated in the green bedroom.
The walls are covered with portraits depicting Tyutchev's closest friends and family members.
The portrait on the wall (third from the left) depicts the poet's wife, Ernestina Tyutcheva, “a woman of splendid beauty and intellect”, as she was described by contemporaries. The portrait was made by Friedrich Durk in 1840.
The main sitting-room is the biggest and the most ceremonial room in the house. It is full of pieces of decorative and fine art from the 18th-19th centuries.
How to get there: Take a suburban train from Moscow's Yaroslavsky Railway Station ( see schedule) to Ashukinskaya, then bus 34 or a local minibus (100 rubles ~ 2 USD) to the stop

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