How Russian sappers are demining Syrian Palmyra

Russian sappers continue demining the ancient Syrian city of Palmyra.

Russian sappers continue demining the ancient Syrian city of Palmyra.

AP
Russian combat engineers arrived in Syria on a mission to clear mines in Palmyra, which has been recaptured from Islamic State militants.
In this picture taken on April 1, 2016, damage is seen in the ancient city of Palmyra in the central city of Homs, Syria. Explosions rocked the ancient town of Palmyra on Friday and on the horizon, black smoke wafted behind its majestic Roman ruins, as Syrian army experts carefully detonated hundreds of mines they say were planted by Islamic State militants before they fled the town.
Russian combat engineers arrived in Syria on a mission to clear mines in Palmyra, which has been recaptured from Islamic State militants in an offensive that has proven Russia’s military might in Syria despite a drawdown of its warplanes.
Terrorists destroyed many priceless antique monuments and carried out public executions in the ancient amphitheater.
They are clearing explosive devices from an area of more than 180 hectares.
A Russian serviceman checks for mines in the Palmyra ancient ruins, Syria.
Explosives found in the ancient town of Palmyra. Islamic State militants have not only destroyed many of Palmyra's heritage sites but they have also laid mines in historic and residential parts of the town.
The operation to liberate Palmyra began in mid-March. On March 27, Syrian troops with the support of the Russian Air Force liberated Palmyra from Islamic State militants, who captured the city in May 2015.
Read more