Moscow Metro: Underground Monument of Architecture

The Shchusev State Museum of Architecture presents an exhibition of original plans and photos of the Moscow Metro. / I. Fomin, N. Anrikanis. Metro Station Project “Krasnye Vorota”. 1934.

The Shchusev State Museum of Architecture presents an exhibition of original plans and photos of the Moscow Metro. / I. Fomin, N. Anrikanis. Metro Station Project “Krasnye Vorota”. 1934.

Press photo / Shchusev State Museum of Architecture
Original blueprints now on display.
Not all of the projects presented here were put into practice. Some of them remained quite literally on the drawing board, such as this draft of Kievskaya Station by Georgyi Golts. The ivy-colored columns were ultimately replaced by poles with mosaic panels. / G. Golz. Metro Station Project "Kiyevskaya". 1944-1945.
The exhibited works are of interest not only as architectural plans for Metro stations, but as an important example of Soviet draftsmanship. / D. Chechulin. Metro Station Project “Okhotny Ryad”. 1934.
Hand-drawn detailed blueprints are now on display as part of a large exposition entitled 'Moscow Metro: Underground Museum of Architecture'.
The very first line of the Moscow Metro was officially unveiled on May 15, 1935. Running from Sokolniki to Park Kultury, the line was just 11 kilometers long and featured 13 stations. / D. Fridman. Central Electrical Substation Project. 1930s.
But from its humble beginnings, the Moscow metro has since expanded to become the world's busiest underground rail system outside Asia, with over 9 million journeys made on the network every day. / D. Chechulin, A. Tarhov. Metro station Komsomolskaya". 1938.
The system is considered the most beautiful metro in the world, with the opulent decoration of many of its older stations leaving newcomers astounded. / D. Chechulin. Metro Station Dynamo. Photo by V. Savostianov and L. Velikzhanin. 1947.
Today there are 196 stations in the capital's subway system (44 of which are cultural heritage sites), and the network is continuing to expand. / N.Kolli, S. Andrievsky, with the assistance of L. Schuhareva. Metro Station “Izmaylovskaya” (now “Partizanskaya”). Late 1940s.
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