Fox Manor: Adorable photos of Russian wildlife

They are captured on film hunting, taking care of cubs, playing, sleeping and posing for the camera.

They are captured on film hunting, taking care of cubs, playing, sleeping and posing for the camera.

Alexandr Sidontsev
The dramatic life of foxes in Russia's wild nature.
 Russian photographer Alexander Sidontsev presents a series of photos taken of foxes in the Russian wilderness over several years.
Foxes in Chukotka differ in their lighter color and larger size, which is characteristic of animals that move from south to north.
In the North of Russia, especially in the mountains, there are also foxes with black and other-colored furs, like blackish brown.
The most common type of colors is a bright red back, a light-colored belly, and dark paws.
When looking for its next meal, the fox is endlessly cunning. It can play dead or intrigue its prey by its strange behavior.
Sometimes the foxes are even up for catching birds, even making runs on chicken coops. But this happens a lot less often than old wives' tales would have it.
Foxes' primary nutrition consists of small rodents (field mice, lemmings) that they can find even under the snow.
There are a total of 400 different kinds of plants and animals that the fox consumes, including watermelons (in Russian North, these are, of course, grown in greenhouses).
You can find more photos by Alexander Sidontsev on his Instagram page.
The Kamchatka Peninsula is known as Russia’s “bear state” with between 15,000 and 30,000 bears living there, sharing the territory with foxes. Another “fox manor” in Russia is Chukotka, a region in Russia’s Far East. The distance from Moscow to the capital of the Chukotka Autonomous Region, Anadyr, is 6,186 kilometers, while Kamchatka’s capital is 6,515 km away from Moscow.
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