Borscht, the most well-known beetroot soup

Please welcome Borscht, the most well-know beetroot soup in Russia.

RBTH and the author of Spicyblog, professional cook Peter Golavskiy, are proud to present the new issue of our cookery video podcast. Borscht is an immortal classic, a symbol, and the face of Russian cuisine. Real borscht takes a while to prepare. But it's worth it. Watch the video and unveil Russian cookery secrets!

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Borscht is a variety of soup based on beet, and a traditional dish. It is very popular among many nations of Eastern and Central Europe. For instance, it is part of the national cuisine of Ukraine, Russia, Poland, Belarus, Romania, Moldavia, and Lithuania. Borscht is supposed to be one of the best national vodka side-dishes.

Meat stock (for 4 l.):Soup:

1 kg beef ribs

1 kg chicken and beef bones

3 carrots

3 onions

2 bulbs of garlic

bayleaf and allspice to taste

aromatic herbs to taste

salt

6-7 beetroot

1/2 head of white cabbage

2 onions

1 big carrot

6-7 potatoes

40 ml lemon juice

1 tbsp tomato puree

4-5 cloves of garlic

sunflower oil

salt   

As for the differences between Ukrainian and Russian borscht, we would single out the following:

1. Usually the ingredients for Russian borscht do not contain potato, although it is recommended to add it whole or sliced ​​with fresh tomatoes.

2. A mandatory ingredient of Ukrainian borscht is, of course, salo (lard), while the Russian recipe does without.

3. The Russian recipe contains half the amount of cabbage, but more carrots, which in Ukrainian borscht can either be left out (only the vague term "vegetable root" is mentioned) or added whole and then removed.

4. Russian borscht contains no added flour.

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