Russian senator suggests punishing attempts to revive Nazism and deny Holocaust

A bill reaffirming the unacceptability of measures to revive Nazism, portray Nazi criminals and their accomplices as heroes and deny the Holocaust was submitted to the State Duma, the lower chamber of Russia's parliament, on Monday.

"The need to draft a bill highlighting the unacceptability of steps to revive Nazism, portray Nazi criminals and their accomplices as heroes and deny the Holocaust stems, on one hand, from the growing scope of attempts to review the results of World War II, justify crimes against peace and security and turn a blind eye to other negative aspects, and, on the other hand, from the absence of a framework regulating efforts to prevent the revival of Nazism in different areas of public and state life," Senator Boris Shpigel, the author of the bill, said in an explanatory note.

Shpigel also proposed introducing amendments into the Russian Penal Code's Article 282 that would allow courts to order people convicted of these crimes to pay fines from 100,000 rubles to 300,000 rubles, or an amount equivalent to their salary for one or two years.

As an alternative, they could be sentenced to up to 360 hours of community service, or even a prison sentence of up to two years.

Fines from 100,000 rubles to 500,000 rubles could be imposed on people who commit these crimes by using, or threatening to use, violence, exceeding their authority or within an organized group.

Alternative sanctions include a fine equivalent to a convicted person's salary for up to three years, a ban on holding public office for up to five years, up to 480 hours of community service, or even a prison term of up to five years.

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