Putin expects to meet personally with Obama in the near future

Russian President Vladimir Putin expects to meet personally with U.S. President Barack Obama in the near future.

"I hope to meet with him personally in the near future, and we will have several such opportunities this year," Putin said at a meeting with U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry in Moscow on Tuesday.

Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov said the two presidents may meet next time during the G8 summit in Northern Ireland.

"I am really pleased that our contacts with our partners from the U.S. are continuing at all levels and regularly. Just recently, President Obama and I twice had quite long and substantive telephone conversations," Putin said.

Putin said the two had the opportunity to discuss various aspects of bilateral relations between the two countries and pointed out that he had also received a letter from Obama. "We are preparing a reply letter now," he said.

The Russian leader also said it is important for key Russian and U.S. agencies to cooperate in addressing urgent global problems. "We are really happy to see you, because this is an opportunity to talk in person on problems that we deem important," he said.

Putin and Kerry also discuss the Syrian crisis. The U.S. and Russia's interests regarding the settlement in Syria coincide, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry told President Vladimir Putin.

The U.S. administration believes that United States' and Russia's interests regarding Syria largely coincide, he said. This is so because the U.S. and Russia are interested in stability in this region, Kerry said.

Russia and the United States want this region to be free of extremists who create problems, he said. The U.S. and Russia share a common approach which is reflected in the Geneva communique, Kerry said, adding that he hopes for a detailed discussion of these issues with Putin in order to find common ground and points of agreement.

Problems facing the United States and Russia require cooperation of a scope characteristic of the World War II era, said U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry.

Not all in the United States understand what sacrifice - material and human - Russia made to win the victory in World War II jointly with its allies and partners, Kerry told President Vladimir Putin.

Kerry also said that Russia and the United States need to fulfill a series of hard tasks that require a similar level of cooperation.

He said Russian and American experts are cooperating in investigating the Boston terror attack and he thanked the Russian president for this cooperation.

Kerry said thet he had been briefed by President Barack Obama about his recent telephone talks with Putin and that Obama is grateful to Putin for finding time for the talks.

Obama also thinks, Kerry said, that intensive economic cooperation between Russia and the United States may create conditions for promoting bilateral relations further.

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