Russia's chances of recovering money stolen by Berezovsky are minimal - source

The Russian authorities have virtually lost their chances for retaking the money stolen by businessman Boris Berezovsky from Aeroflot and the Samara region's budget, sources familiar with the situation told Interfax.

The Russian authorities have virtually lost their chances for retaking the money stolen by businessman Boris Berezovsky from Aeroflot and the Samara region's budget, sources familiar with the situation told Interfax.

 "His death was followed by a long line of creditors and heirs, who will be dividing his assets. The thing is that many of them are under encumbrances, have been pledged and re-pledged," a source told Interfax on Wednesday.

The relevant Russian authorities have done a lot of work to search for the oligarch's assets, which showed that "the chances of recovering the money are virtually minimal."

"It appears that the businessman conducted his affairs in such a way as to confuse all tax and supervisory bodies. For example, he registered over 600 firms in the Netherlands alone. The same happened in other countries," the source said.

"The most effective way is to go to look for solutions to this problem in the sphere of civil law. Interested parties should file lawsuits with the courts of London and other assets where Berezovsky's assets are present, which will go to his heirs," the source said.

The Moscow department of the Federal Bailiff Service is now conducing legal proceedings against the businessmen and several debtors seeking to recover a total of 3.2 billion rubles. The recoverors are JSC Aeroflot - Russian Airlines and the Samara region's government.

Federal Bailiff Service Director Artur Parchyonchikov said in April his agency may file a lawsuit to seek the recovery of Berezovsky's debts from his legal successors.

Berezovsky emigrated to London in 2000. In Russia, the businessman was charged with numerous crimes and was sentenced to a prison term in absentia.

On March 23, it was reported that Berezovsky had died in his house in the UK at he age of 67. On March 26, Scotland Yard published official autopsy results, which showed no evidence of violence. The experts said the businessman apparently committed suicide.

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