Official: U.S. takes reasonable stand on Sochi Games boycott idea

The U.S. authorities have acted reasonably in their rejection of the idea of an American senator that the United States should boycott the Sochi Olympic Games, State Duma International Affairs Committee Chairman Alexei Pushkov said.

The U.S. authorities have acted reasonably in their rejection of the idea of an American senator that the United States should boycott the Sochi Olympic Games, State Duma International Affairs Committee Chairman Alexei Pushkov said.

"The U.S. has rejected the appeals for boycotting the Sochi Games 2014. The main reasons were the failed boycott of the Moscow Games 1980 and Russia's importance for the U.S. That was wise and realistic," Pushkov wrote on Twitter.

White House spokesman Jay Carney told a press briefing that the boycott in retaliation against the case of former CIA agent Edward Snowden was actually "a bad idea".

Speaking about the proposal of Senator Lindsey Graham, Carney said, "We're not even - we're not focused on that. We're focused on working with the Russians to bring about the return of Mr. Snowden to the United States. And we agree with President Putin that we do not want this issue to negatively affect our relationship with Russia."

In his opinion, the idea of the U.S. boycott of the Sochi Games is not even topical.

U.S. congressmen and the U.S. National Olympic Committee have also opposed the boycott proposal.

"If there are any lessons to be learned from the American boycott of 1980, it is that Olympic boycotts do not work," said Patrick Sandusky, US Olympic Committee spokesman.

"Our boycott of the 1980 Olympic Games did not contribute to a successful resolution of the underlying conflict [in Afghanistan], it did, however, deprive hundreds of American athletes, all whom had completely dedicated themselves to representing our nation at the Olympic Games, of the opportunity of a lifetime," he said.

Joe Boehner, Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, also said that the boycott idea was wrong.

"Why would we want to punish US athletes who've been training for three years to compete in the Olympics over a traitor who can't find a place to call home?" he wondered.

U.S. Senator John McCain was also negative about the boycott idea.

"There are many things we can do, but I think the experience of canceling the Olympics the last time [in Moscow in 1980] around wasn't very good," he said.

All rights reserved by Rossiyskaya Gazeta.

More exciting stories and videos on Russia Beyond's Facebook page

This website uses cookies. Click here to find out more.

Accept cookies