Almost 60 percent of Russians assert tension in North Caucasus - poll

The majority of Russians continue to claim that tensions exist in the North Caucasus but their number is declining, Levada Center sociologists told Interfax.

The majority of Russians continue to claim that tensions exist in the North Caucasus but their number is declining, Levada Center sociologists told Interfax.

Nineteen percent of 1,601 respondents polled in 130 towns and cities in 45 regions in July argued that all was quiet in the North Caucasus and two percent even said the situation was good.

Some 58 percent declared tensions, and 8 percent maintained the situation was highly charged. The number of such respondents declined from 64 percent and 11 percent respectively over the past three years, the sociologists said.

Over a half of the respondents (57 percent) have been invariably asserting since 2011 that the situation in North Caucasian republics of Russia was unlikely to change in the upcoming year.

Twelve percent of the respondents expressed their hope for the alleviation of regional tensions, which was 4 percent less than in 2011 (16 percent). Fifteen percent said the situation might deteriorate further. Their numbers have remained practically unchanged for the past three years: 15 percent in 2010 and 14 percent in 2011-2012. Seventeen percent were unable to answer the question.

All rights reserved by Rossiyskaya Gazeta.

More exciting stories and videos on Russia Beyond's Facebook page

This website uses cookies. Click here to find out more.

Accept cookies