Russian Foreign Ministry finds Manning's sentence unjustifiably tough

Russian Foreign Ministry envoy for human rights, democracy and the supremacy of law Konstantin Dolgov has described as unjustifiably tough the sentence of Bradley Manning, a U.S. army soldier and informer of Wikileaks, who was sentenced to 35 years of jail.

Russian Foreign Ministry envoy for human rights, democracy and the supremacy of law Konstantin Dolgov has described as unjustifiably tough the sentence of Bradley Manning, a U.S. army soldier and informer of Wikileaks, who was sentenced to 35 years of jail.

"When the interests of the United States are concerned, the American judicial system like in the case of Manning, makes unjustifiably tough decisions to scare off others without any consideration for human rights' aspects," he said.

"Such manifestations of dual standards regarding the supremacy of law and human rights once again prove that U.S. claims for leadership in these important spheres are groundless," Dolgov said.

"According to the reports of many human rights organizations, including American, the information disclosed by Manning exposed numerous abuses by the U.S. army in Iraq and Afghanistan, including the death of civilians, the torture of prisoners and other crude violations of international law on human rights, in a word, everything that the U.S. government so enthusiastically advocates and promotes throughout the world," Dolgov said.

"Despite the energetic demands from mechanisms of international control in the sphere of human rights, in particular, special procedures of the UN Human Rights' Council and the human rights community nobody in the United States was ever punished for these offenses," Dolgov said.

Manning was convicted in July of most of the charges, including several violations of the Espionage Act, but was acquitted of aiding the enemy, the most serious charge.

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