Russian S-300 missile systems intended for Iran disposed of

The S-300 surface-to-air missile systems that Russia planned to export to Iran have already been dismantled and partially disposed of.

The S-300 surface-to-air missile systems that Russia planned to export to Iran have already been dismantled and partially disposed of.

"The hardware that was intended for Iran no longer exists. We have dismantled all of these systems. We will subsequently use some of their components. These systems have been partially disposed of. This information is totally reliable," Russian Almaz-Antey weapons producer general director Vladislav Menshchikov told reporters on the sidelines of the MAKS-2013 international air show in the town of Zhukovsky outside Moscow on Thursday.

Menshchikov explained that each contract is tailored to meet the needs of a particular customer, and it cannot be used for another client.

"It involves different compositions of these systems, different specific requirements and different software," he said.

"We had no choice but dispose of most of the hardware [intended for Iran]," he added.

The contract on the delivery of S-300 air defense missile systems was signed by Moscow and Tehran in 2007, drawing fierce criticism from Israeli and U.S. authorities. The UN Security Council adopted a fourth resolution spelling out sanctions against Iran in June 2010.

It imposed the first ever curb on conventional weapons deliveries to Tehran, including missiles and missile systems, tanks, assault helicopters, warplanes and warships.

Russia said that the sanctions covered the contract with Tehran for the delivery of S-300 missile systems, developed and made by Almaz-Antey Concern.

Dmitry Medvedev, then the president of Russia, signed a decree on September 22, 2010 on the implementation of UN Security Council Resolution 1929, dated June 9, 2010, and Russia annulled the S-300 contacts with Tehran on October 7.

Iran filed a $4 billion lawsuit with the Geneva international arbitration court against Rosoboronexport protesting the failure of the S-300 contract.

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