Ukraine's EU association deal would violate treaty of friendship with Russia - Kremlin aide

If Ukraine signs an association agreement with the European Union, the Ukrainian-Russia basic treaty of friendship and cooperation will be violated, said Kremlin aide Sergei Glazyev.

If Ukraine signs an association agreement with the European Union, the Ukrainian-Russia basic treaty of friendship and cooperation will be violated, said Kremlin aide Sergei Glazyev.

"By signing the association agreement, Ukraine will violate Article 13 of the basic treaty, which says that our countries 'will refrain from moves that could do economic harm to each other, coordinate their financial, monetary-lending, budget, currency, investment, price, tax, trade and customs policies, and deepen economic integration on the basis of mutual benefit and harmonization of economic laws'," he said in an interview with Kommersant-Ukraina, published on Tuesday.

By opting for association with the EU, Ukraine is departing from Article 13 of the Treaty of Friendship, Cooperation and Partnership with Russia, he said. "This does not mean we will reconsider the Treaty, but we will have to take note of the fact that Ukraine is making a unilateral decision without consulting with Russia, which makes the implementation of this article impossible," Glazyev said.

"In short, by signing an association agreement with the EU, Ukraine will lose its independence and cease to be a full-fledged strategic partner for us," he said.

Asked whether Russia will thereby gain the right not to observe some of the Treaty's provisions, Glazyev said, "we will not think about this as long as the association agreement remains unsigned."

Glazyev earlier said that if Ukraine signs an association agreement with the EU it will cease to be a strategic partner for Russia and will actually lose the status of a subject of international law.

All rights reserved by Rossiyskaya Gazeta.

More exciting stories and videos on Russia Beyond's Facebook page

This website uses cookies. Click here to find out more.

Accept cookies