Detectives suspect suicide bomber's husband of connection to Volgograd bombing

The Russian Investigative Committee has asked citizens for information about Naida Asiyalova, a suicide bomber who blew herself up in Volgograd, and about her common-law husband, Dmitry Sokolov, who is suspected of being involved in the terrorist attack, Russian Investigative Committee spokesman Vladimir Markin said.

The Russian Investigative Committee has asked citizens for information about Naida Asiyalova, a suicide bomber who blew herself up in Volgograd, and about her common-law husband, Dmitry Sokolov, who is suspected of being involved in the terrorist attack, Russian Investigative Committee spokesman Vladimir Markin said.

"Detectives have reasons to suspect that the common-law husband of Asiyalova, 21-year-old Dmitry Sokolov who is believed missing, might have helped organize the attack," Markin told Interfax on Wednesday.

He said that the detectives asked anyone who might have any information about Asiyalova and Sokolov, such as their places of employment or residence, to report it to the Volgograd department of the Russian Investigative Committee.

"The Investigative Committee guarantees confidentiality of information or even witness protection if necessary," Markin said.

Asiyalova, a native of Dagestan, lived in Moscow for the past few years and worked for a private company. She regularly visited her hometown.

"The detectives have reconstructed the last day of her life practically minute by minute. Information collected by the police and the results of investigative procedures showed that Asiyalova, wearing a hijab, came to Volgograd and walked along the crowded streets in the Dzerzhinsky and Sovetsky districts, including near the Akvarel shopping mall. She took the Route 29 bus from there and blew herself up," Markin said.

Sokolov's parents residing in the Moscow region reported his disappearance in the summer of 2012, he said.

"They said their son went to a mosque and never came home. Nothing has been known about his whereabouts since then. He became acquainted with his future common-law wife Asiyalova about three years ago. They had the same interest, radical Islam," Markin said.

The Monday bus bombing in Volgograd killed six people and injured a total of 55 people, including 20 children, the Russian Health Ministry said.

"The updated information indicates that 55 people, including 20 children, were injured in an explosion on a passenger bus in Volgograd, and six people were killed," the Health Ministry said on Wednesday.

Twenty-seven people currently remain in Volgograd hospitals with blast injuries, burns, and injuries caused by secondary elements of the explosive charge. "All medical organizations providing help to the victims are fully supplied with blood, plasma, blood substitutes and medicines," it said.

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