Russia ready to provide legal assistance to ice hockey player Varlamov - Foreign Ministry

Ice hockey player Semyonov Varlamov did not turn to Russia for assistance yet after domestic violence charges were brought against him in the United States, said Konstantin Dolgov, the Russian Foreign Ministry's commissioner for human rights, democracy and rule of law.

Ice hockey player Semyonov Varlamov did not turn to Russia for assistance yet after domestic violence charges were brought against him in the United States, said Konstantin Dolgov, the Russian Foreign Ministry's commissioner for human rights, democracy and rule of law.

"Semyon Varlamov has not turned to Russia for assistance yet," has said in answer to a question from Interfax.

The Russian consular service in San Francisco maintains contact with Varlamov, ready to provide assistance when needed, he also said.

"Of course, we are ready to defend his rights as a Russian citizen," Dolgov said.

He added that since Varlamov was freed on $5,000 bail his freedom has not been restricted.

The next hearings of Varlamov case have been set for November 14.

Thursday's hearing started from the defense attorney's demand that reporters leave the courtroom. But the demand was rejected. However, the demand that the Colorado Avalanche goalkeeper be allowed the cross the state's border was accepted.

The court also forbade Varlamov to approach the suspected victim, which is a normal procedure when domestic violence cases are handled. The woman, whose name was not officially disclosed, claimed Varlamov had beaten her up.

A police report released on Thursday says that Varlamov attacked her and kicked her on the chest. He stepped on her when she fell and dragged her out of the bedroom by the hair with her face to the floor, and said that if this had happened in Russia he would be beaten her more severely. Then he took her by the shoulders, shook her and dropped her on the floor, the report says.

The charges brought against the hockey player carry up to six years in jail. In addition to domestic violence charges he is faced with second degree kidnapping counts, since it involves temporary confinement of another person.

The Colorado club declined to comment on the situation to Interfax.

All rights reserved by Rossiyskaya Gazeta.

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