U.S. and Russian officials to discuss possible joint probe against Magnitsky List suspects - sources

U.S. and Russian law enforcement agencies may jointly look into criminal cases of mutual interest, among them the cases opened against several persons included in the so-called Magnitsky List, a U.S. blacklist of Russian officials accused of human rights abuses and money laundering, sources familiar with the situation told Interfax.

U.S. and Russian law enforcement agencies may jointly look into criminal cases of mutual interest, among them the cases opened against several persons included in the so-called Magnitsky List, a U.S. blacklist of Russian officials accused of human rights abuses and money laundering, sources familiar with the situation told Interfax.

A U.S. delegation made up of employees of the Department of Justice and the Federal Bureau of Investigation is expected to arrive in Moscow within the next few days to hold negotiations with Russian officials on whether it was possible to cooperate as part of these inquiries, they said.

"The American side earlier discussed the prospects for cooperation between U.S. and Russian law enforcement agencies on concrete criminal cases, including those opened against certain officials mentioned in the Magnitsky List who are suspected of the large-scale misappropriation of budget funds and money laundering abroad," one of the sources said.

"The Russian side has also displayed its interest in this matter," he added.

The Magnitsky Act was authored by U.S. Senator Benjamin Cardin.

U.S. President Barack Obama signed the Magnitsky Act on December 14, 2012. The U.S. believes that the investigation into Hermitage Capital auditor Sergei Magnitsky's death at a Moscow detention center in 2009 was conducted inappropriately. Russia has dismissed these accusations.

Magnitsky's death has officially been attributed to heart failure. The Investigative Committee closed down a criminal case into Magnitsky's death for the absence of a criminal event.

The U.S. published the list of 18 Russian citizens subject to sanctions under the Magnitsky Act on April 12. These are primarily law enforcement and judicial officials who, according to the list authors, had to do with the investigation into a criminal case against Magnitsky.

In response to this, the Russian Foreign Ministry published its own list of 11 U.S. citizens denied entry to Russia.

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