Russian Foreign Ministry slams OSCE mission's Ukraine report

A report by the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) monitoring mission in Ukraine grossly misrepresents the situation in this country, the Russian Foreign Ministry said.

A report by the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) monitoring mission in Ukraine grossly misrepresents the situation in this country, the Russian Foreign Ministry said.

"We have carefully read the report by the ODIHR [Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights] and the OSCE High Commissioner for National Minorities. Its content misrepresents the real state of affairs in Ukraine. It ignores instances of gross violations by the de-facto Kyiv authorities, with the West's backing, of the fundamental human rights, including the right to the freedom of expression," Russian Foreign Ministry Human Rights Commissioner Konstantin Dolgov wrote on Twitter.

The report lacks any information about the rise of neo-Nazism, xenophobia, ultra-nationalism and anti-Semitism in Ukraine, he said.

"The destructive role of Maidan activists, as well as the punitive operation against civilians in the southeast, were of no interest to the OSCE mission either. Instead, the authors point, with no evidence, to imaginary human rights violations in the Russian Republic of Crimea and the southeastern regions of Ukraine," the Russian diplomat said.

"We are calling on the OSCE leaders and its special mission in Ukraine to assess the disastrous human rights situation in this country fully and comprehensively," Dolgov wrote.

A report by the OSCE's Human Rights Assessment Mission in Ukraine headlined "Human Rights and Minority Rights Situation" says, in particular, that the monitors "found a significant number of serious violations of human rights" in various parts of Ukraine, including "murder and physical assaults," the victims being primarily "pro-Maidan activists and journalists, and those in Crimea also included Ukrainian military personnel and members of the Tatar community."

The document authors claim that anti-Maidan activists arrived in some regions of Ukraine from populated areas close to the Russian border "in buses or private vehicles, some of which had either no license plates or Russian Federation license plates."

The document also says that "freedom of movement has seen significant restrictions in Crimea," points to "a reported lack of clarity on the future residency status of those choosing not to take Russian citizenship and to retain their Ukrainian citizenship instead."

Read more: Moscow acknowledges Donetsk and Lugansk votes but urges Kiev to begin talks>>>

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