Russia, China can host each other's ground navigation stations

The head of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) is planning to visit China to discuss various areas of cooperation, including the placement of the GLONASS and BEIDOU stations in each other's territories.

The head of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) is planning to visit China to discuss various areas of cooperation, including the placement of the GLONASS and BEIDOU stations in each other's territories.

"Very soon I will personally make a trip to China to discuss with our partners various cooperation options, including what to put, where and how," said Roscosmos chief Oleg Ostapenko, when asked about a possibility of Russia's GLONASS ground stations being deployed in China and China's BEIDOU in Russia.

It was reported earlier that Russia and China are contemplating the possibility of building three such stations in each other's territories.

The Global Navigation Satellite System (GLONASS) was commissioned by the Soviet Defense Ministry. It is an analogue of the U.S. GPS system. GLONASS is designed to promptly provide navigation and temporal support for an unlimited number of ground, sea, air and space-based users. Access to GLONASS civilian signals in any part of the globe is provided to Russian and foreign consumers free of charge and with no restrictions. The system is based on 24 satellites moving above the Earth surface in three orbital planes at an orbital inclination of 64.8 degrees and altitude of 19,100 kilometers.

The Chinese satellite navigation system BEIDOU consists of two groups of satellites. The first one, BEIDOU-1, consisting of three satellites, was launched in 2000. The second group, BEIDOU-2 (COMPASS), is due to be completed by 2020.

The system was named BEIDOU in honor of the Great Bear constellation.

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