Russians against Moscow's possible military role in east Ukraine conflict - poll

More than 55 percent of Russian citizens recently interviewed by the Levada Center believe that full-scale fighting will resume in eastern Ukraine after the ceasefire comes to an end, but they do not want Russia to get involved in the conflict, the center's sociologists told Interfax.

More than 55 percent of Russian citizens recently interviewed by the Levada Center believe that full-scale fighting will resume in eastern Ukraine after the ceasefire comes to an end, but they do not want Russia to get involved in the conflict, the center's sociologists told Interfax.

Twenty-one percent of respondents hope that a peace treaty will be signed and that the crisis in Ukraine's eastern regions will be resolved peacefully. Twenty-five percent of those polled were unable to answer this question.

The survey was conducted in 134 Russian cities, towns and villages on November 14-17 and involved 1,600 people.

According to the results, 23 percent of Russians believe that Russia will have to send its armed forces to eastern Ukraine if full-scale hostilities resume in the region. Fifty-nine percent of respondents said they were opposed to Russian military intervention in the conflict, and 20 percent were undecided.

Thirty-six percent of those polled believe that Ukraine should address the conflict in its eastern regions on its own, another 36 percent said that the problem should be resolved with Russian mediation, and 16 percent of respondents believe that Russia should support the Donetsk (DPR) and Luhansk (LPR) to the end and use all methods, even including military intervention in order to secure these regions' independence.

Sixty-five percent of respondents also said they were confident that Russia should recognize the DPR and the LPR as independent states, 12 percent of those polled described this step as "undesirable", and 23 percent were unable to answer the question.

Sixty-three percent of respondents called the November 2 elections in the self-proclaimed republics legitimate, 17 percent took the opposite view, and 20 percent were undecided.

All rights reserved by Rossiyskaya Gazeta.

More exciting stories and videos on Russia Beyond's Facebook page

This website uses cookies. Click here to find out more.

Accept cookies