Warsaw's stance insults memory of Auschwitz liberators - FJCR head

The Polish authorities' refusal to invite Russian President Vladimir Putin to the commemorations of the 70th anniversary of the liberation of the Auschwitz concentration camp during World War II was "some kind of exoneration of fascism," Federation of the Jewish Communities of Russian (FJCR) President Alexander Boroda has said.

The Polish authorities' refusal to invite Russian President Vladimir Putin to the commemorations of the 70th anniversary of the liberation of the Auschwitz concentration camp during World War II was "some kind of exoneration of fascism," Federation of the Jewish Communities of Russian (FJCR) President Alexander Boroda has said.

"We were extremely outraged by their decision. In this situation, Poland is only the territory on which the Auschwitz concentration camp was located, not the party allowed to decide who should be invited to an important event such as the 70th anniversary of the liberation of this camp," Boroda told Interfax-Religion on Friday.

Warsaw's refusal to invite the Russian president - "the president of the country which is the legal and historical successor of the Soviet Union, the country whose troops played a decisive role in the Great Victory, was not only an attempt to rewrite history," Boroda said.

"Rather, it was an insult to the memory of the soldiers who liberated Auschwitz. It was even an exoneration of fascism to a certain extent," he added.

All rights reserved by Rossiyskaya Gazeta.