Comet 67P/C-G is a fragment of Jupiter's solid nucleus - Russian expert

The first data about the 67P Churyumov-Gerasimenko comet (also known as 67P or 67P/C-G), obtained by the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft and its lander, Philae, confirm Russian researchers' doubts that Europeans will find evidence of leftover particles resulting from the creation of the Solar System on this comet, Russian researcher Yevgeny Dmitriyev told Interfax-AVN on Monday.

The first data about the 67P Churyumov-Gerasimenko comet (also known as 67P or 67P/C-G), obtained by the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft and its lander, Philae, confirm Russian researchers' doubts that Europeans will find evidence of leftover particles resulting from the creation of the Solar System on this comet, Russian researcher Yevgeny Dmitriyev told Interfax-AVN on Monday.

The data received from Rosetta and Philae will inspire supporters of the forgotten theory of the eruptive origin of comets and bury the relict theory, he said.

The following arguments support the first theory, Dmitriyev said.

"The 67P comet is Jupiter's short-period comet which owes its origin to this planet. It is a fragment of the core of Jupiter\'s solid nucleus. The comet could not have assumed its current form, or obtained its current landscape as a result of an accumulation of substance from the proto-planet disk, as in that case mass build up would have been chaotic, while the bodies thus formed would have been round in shape," he said.

"Images of the comet's surface are reminiscent of earthly landscapes and are a combination of small, flat, curved and up-and-down areas, followed by rocks, ravines, cliffs, boulders, and easy-to-see sediments. The comet's makeup matches fragments of the core from Jupiter's depths. By all accounts, such landscapes are typical of the surface of the planet's solid nucleus. The comet's low density suggests that there are many hollow spaces inside its body, the origins of which can be explained by powerful degassing of volatile components from the deep and hot layers of the atmosphere. Figuratively speaking, 67P is a coarse-pored huge clinker cake with rock inclusions," Dmitriyev said.

The "odorous" gases discovered on the comet are the likely traces of the poisonous atmosphere of Jupiter's deep layers, he said.

Another observation is that, "the slopes of individual rocks are covered with some round objects, which Dr. Holger Sierks, an astronomer from the Max Plank Institute, described as "dinosaur's eggs". They could be cakes of comet material, most likely tektites, formed by lightening bolts during comet ejection," Dmitriyev said.

Dmitriyev adheres to a new theory in science, known as comet meteoritics. He is convinced that comet meteorites are the creation of comets of eruptive origin - comets that are not remains of the protoplanet cloud and do not contain the relict substance of the Solar System, but are fragments of the core of the solid nuclei of giant planets, thrown out from their depths in an eruptive process of an unidentified nature.

He agues that "it is comets that bring life regularly to the Earth and are the main transporters of life across the Universe."

"Comet nuclei, both active and dormant, disguised as asteroids, are the main threat to Earth," he said.

"In the meantime, European scientists' futile attempts to fit the data obtained on 67P into the Procrustean bed of the theory of comets' relict origin do not look convincing. It is not known how much time it will take scientists to understand that they see a fragment of the core of Jupiter's solid nucleus, not a relict comet," Dmitriyev said.

The 67P/C-G comet was discovered in 1969 by two Soviet astronomers. Rosetta was launched on March 2 20144. It was put into orbit around the comet's nucleus at a distance of more than 500 million kilometers from the Earth. Rosetta's lander, Philae, touched down on November 12 2014.

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