British satellite Inmarsat-5F2 inserted into final transfer orbit

A Proton-M launch vehicle that blasted off from the Baikonur space center on Sunday has successfully orbited the British communication satellite Inmarsat-5F2, the Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) told Interfax-AVN on Monday.

A Proton-M launch vehicle that blasted off from the Baikonur space center on Sunday has successfully orbited the British communication satellite Inmarsat-5F2, the Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) told Interfax-AVN on Monday.

"The communication satellite successfully separated from the Briz-M upper stage at 7:02 a.m. Moscow time," an agency spokesman said.

The satellite has been inserted into a final transfer orbit with an inclination of approximately 27 degrees, an apogee of 65,000 kilometers and a perigee of 4,400 kilometers.

It will move to the designated slot in a geostationary orbit at 55 degrees West by burns of its own engine.

Boeing Satellite Systems built Inmarsat-5F2 on the orders of British communication satellite operator Inmarsat. A fueled satellite weighs 6,100 kilograms. The satellite with a service life of 15 years will provide high-speed broadband Internet services, Inmarsat Global Xpress, in North and South Americas and the Atlantic region.

The Proton-M launch vehicle and the Briz-M upper stage were developed and built by the Khrunichev State Space Center.

The Sunday mission was the 402nd launch of Proton and the 88th commercial launch of this vehicle by International Launch Services, a launch services provider controlled by Khrunichev.

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