Savchenko resumes hunger strike

Ukrainian pilot Nadia Savchenko, who is charged with abetting the killing of Russian journalists in Donbas, has resumed her hunger strike in a Moscow detention facility, Anton Tsvetkov, the head of the security commission of the Russian Public Chamber and chairman of the Moscow Public Observation Commission, said.

Ukrainian pilot Nadia Savchenko, who is charged with abetting the killing of Russian journalists in Donbas, has resumed her hunger strike in a Moscow detention facility, Anton Tsvetkov, the head of the security commission of the Russian Public Chamber and chairman of the Moscow Public Observation Commission, said.

According to my information, like I assumed, Nadia Savchenko has announced today that she is resuming her hunger strike," Tsvetkov told Interfax on Monday.

Interfax currently has no confirmation of this information from official representatives of the Federal Penitentiary Service.

Earlier on Monday, Tsvetkov assumed that Savchenko might resume her hunger strike, which she stopped on March 5, after meeting with Ukrainian doctors.

"I will not be surprised if these doctors or people who pretended to be doctors came to Moscow to instruct Savchenko on the need for further actions and steps. One of the possibilities is that her ending her hunger strike does not fit the image of a 'hero of Ukraine' and 'a victim of the Russian regime' and she would decide to resume it after meeting with the doctors," Tsvetkov said.

Tsvetkov said Kyiv needs to maintain the interest in Savchenko, both in Ukraine and in the West, and needs to make a martyr our of her. "Her death as a martyr would be ideal for them," Tsvetkov said.

According to earlier reports, Ukrainian doctors visited Savchenko in the Moscow detention facility on Saturday and advised her not to resume her hunger strike, saying it may seriously affect her health.

Nikolai Polozov, a lawyer for Savchenko, said "the doctors have told Nadia that it is extremely undesirable that she resume her hunger strike, and negative consequences will occur much faster than in the first hunger strike."

"It will take her two months to come out of the hunger strike in hospital," Polozov said, citing Mark Feygin, another lawyer for Savchenko.

Savchenko has been in custody in Moscow since July 2014 on a charge of complicity in the killing of Russian journalists in eastern Ukraine. She denies the charge and claims she was abducted and brought to Russia. On December 13, she declared a hunger strike. On March 5, she agreed to consume broth because of her deteriorating condition.

 

Read more:

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Ukrainian pilot Savchenko partially stops hunger strike, agrees to eat broth

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