It's no use crying over spilled milk - Rogozin says after visit to Spitsbergen

Russian Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Rogozin has commented on the Norwegian Foreign Ministry's request to the Russian authorities to explain his visit to Spitsbergen.

Russian Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Rogozin has commented on the Norwegian Foreign Ministry's request to the Russian authorities to explain his visit to Spitsbergen.

"It's no use crying over spilled milk," he tweeted on Sunday.

The Barents Observer edition wrote earlier that the Norwegian authorities had asked Russia to explain the vice-premier's visit to Spitsbergen. The edition said that Rogozin was blacklisted by the European Union and Norway over Ukraine.

"We have arrived to Spitsbergen"

The visits of blacklisted people to Svalbard are undesirable, Norwegian Foreign Ministry representative Frode Andersen told the edition.

Meanwhile, Russian Foreign Ministry said that Norway's reaction to this visit is absurd from the point of view of international law. 

"Such a reaction causes surprise. It can't be explained and is absurd from the point of view of international law," Russian Foreign Ministry Alexander Lukashevich said in a commentary posted on the ministry's website on Monday.

"Article 3 of the 1920 Spitsbergen Treaty envisages free access to the archipelago for citizens of the countries that are signatories to the Treaty. The said unilateral sanctions do not eliminate this provision of the Treaty and are irrelevant in this case. Thus, there are no grounds to make any claims against Russia from the point of view of international law," Lukashevich said.

"We regret Norway's initiative to join the EU anti-Russia sanctions which causes negative consequences for Russian-Norwegian relations and, as we see, distorts the perception of reality by our Norwegian neighbors," Lukashevich said in his commentary.

"The use of the archipelago for a visit to North Pole 2015 was purely for logistical reasons as per the aviation safety requirements in high latitudes. This circumstance is totally natural and we hoped for the understanding of Norway in the spirit of our partnership in the Arctic, which until now has always been shown by Norway," Lukashevich said.

Rogozin leads the commission on Arctic development issues and was expected to take part in the opening of the North Pole 2015 floating station.

The visit by the Russian deputy prime minister to the archipelago was followed by a negative reaction from Norway because Rogozin is on the EU sanctions list.

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