Most Russians believe perestroika gives them rights, freedom but does not make them happy

The number of Russians believing that perestroika expanded their rights has grown from 44 percent in 1996 to 53 percent at present, the Russian Public Opinion Study Center (VTsIOM) said.

The number of Russians believing that perestroika expanded their rights has grown from 44 percent in 1996 to 53 percent at present, the Russian Public Opinion Study Center (VTsIOM) said.

The opinion is mostly expressed by young respondents aged from 18 through 24 (70 percent), Muscovites and St. Petersburg residents (66 percent) and active Internet users (60 percent).

Thirty-five percent of 1,600 respondents polled in 46 regions on April 4-5 think the opposite.

Sixty-seven percent of Russians believe that perestroika has given them more freedom. The indicator is practically unchanged, 66 percent, since 1996.

As to the opportunity people have in their lives, opinions differ: 46 percent think that the late 1970s provided a greater variety of equal opportunities and 44 percent claim the opposite.

At the same time, Russians are less happy now: 53 percent believe they had more happiness before perestroika and 29 percent think they are enjoying their life more than 35-40 years ago.

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