Mission Control Center adjusts ISS orbit

The Mission Control Center has adjusted the International Space Station (ISS) orbit, a source in the Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) has told Interfax-AVN.

The Mission Control Center has adjusted the International Space Station (ISS) orbit, a source in the Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) has told Interfax-AVN.

"The ISS orbit was adjusted early on Monday morning by burns of the Progress M-26M resupply ship's engines. It will be possible to specify parameters of the new orbit of the station in approximately 90 minutes, after the ISS circles the Earth," the source said.

The previous orbit adjustment attempt made on May 16 was a failure. The onboard computer cancelled the burn of the resupply ship's engines at the very last moment.

The ISS orbit adjustment was necessary to create optimal ballistic conditions for landing of the Soyuz TMA-15M spaceship in Kazakhstan.

Engines of the Progress M-26M resupply ship were supposed to be started at 4:14 a.m. Moscow time on May 16 and run for 901 seconds to give an impetus of 1.64 meters per second for lifting the orbit. The maneuver was due to increase the average altitude of the station by 2.8 kilometers.

The International Space Station is currently manned by an international crew of Anton Shkaplerov, Gennady Padalka and Mikhail Korniyenko (Russia), Samantha Cristoforetti (the ESA), and Terry Virts and Scott Kelly (NASA). Shkaplerov, Cristoforetti and Virts were expected to return to the Earth on May 14, but the return was delayed until June 11.

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