Russian high court clarifies implementation of ECHR judgments in Russia

Russia’s Constitutional Court ruled on Tuesday that the decisions of the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) may not be implemented literally if they contradict the country’s main law.

Russia’s Constitutional Court ruled on Tuesday that the decisions of the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) may not be implemented literally if they contradict the country’s main law.

Judge Sergey Mavrin said if the ECHR judgement made upon a complaint against Russia contradicts the Constitution, then "such a ruling may not be implemented." Russia may in some cases recede from its international commitments if their interpretation violates the Constitution.

The Constitutional Court continues handing down the ruling. The document will enter into force after it is fully announced.

The high court responded to an inquiry from a group of deputies of the State Duma, the lower house of parliament, on applying the ECHR judgments in Russia.

In February 1996, Russia signed the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) and a number of respective protocols. By ratifying these agreements, the country accepted the jurisdiction of the ECHR and committed itself to implement its decisions.

The respective provisions were later included in a range of laws and codes making the ECHR rulings the ground for revising the earlier announced court decisions.

First published by TASS.

All rights reserved by Rossiyskaya Gazeta.

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