Ex-director of Ukrainian plant Znamya sentenced to 6 years in jail in Russia for espionage

The Moscow City Court has sentenced Yury Soloshenko, 73, former director of the Ukrainian plant Znamya, to six years in a high-security penal colony for espionage for Ukraine, an Interfax correspondent has reported, citing the resolution part of the sentence handed out by Justice Andrei Rasnovsky, which was read on Oct. 14.

Source: PhotoXPress

The Moscow City Court has sentenced Yury Soloshenko, 73, former director of the Ukrainian plant Znamya, to six years in a high-security penal colony for espionage for Ukraine, an Interfax correspondent has reported, citing the resolution part of the sentence handed out by Justice Andrei Rasnovsky, which was read on Oct. 14.

The Moscow City Court previously found Soloshenko guilty of espionage for Ukraine.

Soloshenko, a citizen of Ukraine, tried to smuggle secret parts for S-300 surface-to-air missile systems out of Russia, the Federal Security Service press center told Interfax.

"Yury Soloshenko was detained by Federal Security Service officials in August 2014 in Moscow while trying to illegally buy secret parts for S-300 surface-to-air missile systems. He was acting on behalf of the state enterprise Zavod Generator and the corporation Ukraine Sky and the products he planned to buy were intended for recovering Ukrainian air defense systems," the Federal Security Service reported.

"This is not the first time security bodies curb attempts made by citizens of Ukraine to buy in Russia and smuggle military-purpose products," the Federal Security Service said.

Ukrainian citizen Denis Danchenko, who had arrived in Moscow "to buy, bypassing the established procedures, secret drift-tubes and magnetrons for S-300 and Buk-M1 surface-to-air missile systems" was expelled from Russia in December 2014.

The Moscow City Court began trying the case on its merits behind closed doors as it is labeled 'secret' in early October. A lawyer was appointed to the defendant.

Soloshenko's son Alexander said his father had been detained during a business trip to Moscow, where Soloshenko went on the issue of equipment sale, in August 2014.

"Everyone knows that he was set up by his acquaintance, with whom he worked and whom he trusted. My father has been in the defense industry for fifty years. He had established contacts and he was contacted on both sides even after he retired. The enterprise he headed survived by Russian contracts as there was not a single contract in the years of independence. That's why neither we, nor the Russians had no secrets, it was one system. And the espionage charge is just absurd. No one clearly understands why my father was detained. The possible reason is that there is a need for 'spies, high-profile cases," Alexander Soloshenko said.

Yury Soloshenko headed the Poltava plant Znamya for some twenty years. He retired in 2010.

The state-run enterprise Production Association Znamya is a leading manufacturer of super high frequency electrovacuum products for running-wave tubes for air defense systems. The reduction in output and sales negatively impacted the solvency of the Poltava plant and the bankruptcy proceedings were instituted in 2001 under a lawsuit filed by the energy supplying company Poltavaoblenergo. In 2002, the Economic Court of the Poltava region began the financial recovery of the enterprise. In 2008-2009, attempts were made to sell it to draw investment. The enterprise became bankrupt in 2012.

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