Crimea moving toward Russia's continental landmass, say Russian astronomers

“Just after Crimea rejoined with Russia we tried to answer the question: Where is Crimea itself moving towards?" said Ipatov. Photo: Sevastopol, View over Eagle Column.

“Just after Crimea rejoined with Russia we tried to answer the question: Where is Crimea itself moving towards?" said Ipatov. Photo: Sevastopol, View over Eagle Column.

Jane Sweeney, Getty Images
Specialists at the Russian Academy of Sciences have used radio telescopes to analyze movement of the tectonic plate on which the peninsula is located – and insist their conclusion is no joke.

Alexander Ipatov, the director of the Institute of Applied Astronomy at the Russian Academy of Sciences, has announced that by using Quasar-KVO radio interferometric telescope equipment specialists at the Institute have shown that the tectonic plate on which the disputed peninsula of Crimea is located is moving towards the Russian continent, reports the Interfax news agency.

“Just after Crimea rejoined with Russia we tried to answer the question: Where is Crimea itself moving towards? Well we found out that Crimea is moving toward Russia,” said Ipatov.

He added that though this conclusion might seem like a joke – tensions are still high after Moscow's controversial takeover of the peninsula from Ukraine in March 2014 – it is based on the results of serious research.

“At the end of the day it isn’t a joke – but it’s not too dissimilar,” said Ipatov.

First published in Russian by Gazeta.ru

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