Russia’s rank in global corruption index rating remains the same

Transparency International also said that it is skeptical of anti-corruption campaigns that include criminal cases against state officials such as the arrest of the Minister of Economic Development, Alexei Ulyukayev, in November.

Transparency International also said that it is skeptical of anti-corruption campaigns that include criminal cases against state officials such as the arrest of the Minister of Economic Development, Alexei Ulyukayev, in November.

AP
North Korea, South Sudan and Somalia finished last in the Corruption Perceptions Index 2016, with Denmark and New Zealand ranking as the most transparent.

Transparency International ranked 176 countries in its new Corruption Perceptions Index 2016, using a scale of 0 (highly corrupt) to 100 (highly transparent). Over two-thirds of the 176 countries and territories in this year's index fell below the midpoint (lower than 50 points), said the organization’s website.

Denmark and New Zealand topped the ranking, scoring 90 points each; Finland is second (89); and Sweden third (88). Dead last were North Korea (12 points), South Sudan (11), Somalia (10).

Despite the fact that Russia complied in 2016 with the recommendations of the Council of Europe Group of States against Corruption (GRECO), its position did not change in the Corruption Perceptions Index. Russia was ranked 131, the same as in 2015.

The Panama Papers leak is one the most important factors impacting Russia’s position, said the Transparency International report. The Papers mention 11,516 companies related to Russia and 6,285 Russian individuals and legal entities that are owners or directors of those companies, according to a press release. Use of offshore services is not necessarily illegal, however.

Transparency International also said that it is skeptical of anti-corruption campaigns that include criminal cases against state officials such as the arrest of the Minister of Economic Development, Alexei Ulyukayev, in November. Those arrests "are not like a real fight against corruption," but a demonstrative campaign, reported Kommersant, quoting Elena Panfilova, vice-president of Transparency International.

Read more: Russia’s top 5 bribery cases

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