How does one classify as 'poor' in Russia?

In the past five years, the maximum percentage of poor people was registered in March 2016 (42 percent), while the minimum was reached in March 2014 (20 percent).

In the past five years, the maximum percentage of poor people was registered in March 2016 (42 percent), while the minimum was reached in March 2014 (20 percent).

About one-third of Russians can barely afford to buy food and clothing.

The Russian social research center, VCIOM, published (in Russian) the results of a study about poverty, and concluded that the poverty line today in the country is a monthly income of 15,506 rubles ($273) per family member.

The average in Moscow and St. Petersburg is 21,681 rubles ($382), which is much more than that of rural areas where it's 12,478 rubles ($220). Sociologists said the poverty line for Russians two years ago was 11,173 rubles ($198). 

More than 80 percent of Russians think the poor are those who can barely afford food and clothing, and this group of people accounted for 35 percent of the population. Six percent of respondents noted that it's difficult for them even to buy food, while 29 percent said they barely have enough money for clothes. 

In the past five years, the maximum percentage of poor people was registered in March 2016 (42 percent), while the minimum was reached in March 2014 (20 percent).

The poll was conducted between March 22 and 23, and was based on 1,200 telephone interviews of a random sample of home and mobile numbers.

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