Brave New World: Traveling to remote places in the Chechen Republic

A modern tourist base on the lake shore offers hotel rooms and small wooden houses. It is a great chance to stay longer and fully appreciate the local cuisine, sport activities, mountain views, and tiny local villages: some consist of only four families in winter.

A modern tourist base on the lake shore offers hotel rooms and small wooden houses. It is a great chance to stay longer and fully appreciate the local cuisine, sport activities, mountain views, and tiny local villages: some consist of only four families in winter.

Ksenia Isaeva
Russian Caucasus as it is: the hospitality, pristine nature, and local food make up for the difficulties of traveling here.
The Chechen Republic is not safe for independent tourists yet, but the region is working on attracting tourists from all over the world by offering various ‘all-included’ tours for foreigners. The nature here is well preserved, and the lack of big cities makes the air fresh and the lakes crystal clear.
Officially, the Chechen Republic consists of 3 cities and 17 administrative divisions, and each border has a checkpoint where local authorities check travelers’ documents. The checkpoints are one of the region’s "terrorism prevention" measures.
All foreign tourists coming to the Republic and planning to travel outside the capital need to provide documents with the help of a tourist agency in advance (2 months minimum). Passing the security check, they will be allowed to cross the border into the areas outside Grozny.
What does the Chechen Republic have to offer? After you’ve visited its capital Grozny, there are many places to adore.
Although the region is actively working on preventing terrorism, the Chechen Republic is in the list of top 10 regions with the lowest crime in Russia, according to official data in 2015.
The variety of natural treasures will make you stay here longer than planned.
Kezenoi-Am is the largest alpine lake in the North Caucasus (pictured). It is located 1869 meters above sea level; the water here stays cold all year round.
A day’s travel will bring you deep into the mountains along fast-flowing rivers.
According to Caucasian traditions, a guest is the most important person in the house. Be ready to postpone your diet. The local cuisine and traditions mean hunger is off the menu. Be sure to see the traditional Caucasian dance Lezginka and take a headscarf-tying masterclass from local Muslim women.
Some areas are fully closed for foreigners, such as the city of Itum Kali; others are open for travelers on organized tours.
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