Chicken Kiev: A Soviet minced cutlet with a secret inside (RECIPE)

Your guests will lick their plates clean!

Your guests will lick their plates clean!

Yulia Mulino
Do you want to impress your guests? Treat them to this tender Chicken Kiev!

Regarding the birth of this recipe, the name speaks for itself, doesn't it? However, it’s not so easy. In fact, it’s a detective story without any clear answer. French chefs, Russian emigrants in America and Soviet restaurants are all listed to be the authors of this successful dish.  

The first mention of Chicken Kiev in Russian sources is found in the Housekeeping Journal of 1913-1914. It was made from minced meat with a piece of butter inside and coated with egg and breadcrumbs. The recipe was forgotten in the interwar period and revived only after World War II with a chicken fillet. Now, it’s the most common way to cook it in Russia and all over the world (RECIPE).  

Nevertheless, the recipe with the mince is also quite popular, probably because it gives Chicken Kiev its special tenderness. In the past, the meat was beaten with a wooden mallet, and together with butter and cream. Nowadays, it is enough to make chicken minced meat in order to achieve this tender effect. 

I also like using a sweet brioche to be used for crumb coating in order to achieve an exquisite taste. And a special trick is to serve the dish on top of a crouton that helps to catch the secret filling. 

The original recipe does not use many spices; however, black pepper, nutmeg and garlic powder are a great final touch. 

Ingredients: 

  • Chicken breast – 400 g
  • Butter – 150 g
  • Cream (min 30% fat) – 70 g
  • Brioche – 2 pcs
  • Salt
  • Black pepper
  • Nutmeg
  • Garlic powder
  • Greens (choose from dill, parsley, chives, coriander)
  • Garlic – 1 clove
  • Egg mixture: 1 egg, 4 spoons of cream
  • Flour for coating
  • Sunflower oil (to fry) – 500 ml 

Cooking:  

1. Chop the greens and fresh garlic, add a bit of salt and mix with 50 g of soft butter. 

2. Take a rectangular plastic container, put plastic film inside and spread the butter evenly. Close the edges and place in the freezer for about one hour. You will get a nice brick of herbal butter. 

3. Mince the chicken in the machine, add salt, pepper, nutmeg, garlic powder, 100 g of soft butter and cream. 

4. Mix it all. You will see that the cream is absorbed. Put the bowl for 30 minutes in the fridge. 

5. Slice the brioches, dry in the oven or in a toaster and crumble. 

6. By the time the butter and the minced chicken are out of the freezer and the fridge, you will need to prepare three bowls: with flour, with egg mixture and with the crumbs. 

7. Take out a large chunk of butter and cut it while still firm. 

8. Divide the chicken meat mixture into 8 parts (85 g each). Use gloves while working with the meat because it will be a bit sticky. Place a small slab of butter into a cminced cutlet and seal it thoroughly – this is an important moment, because the butter should stay inside when frying. 

9. Put the minced cutlet into flour and coat it evenly. Repeat this with the rest. 

10. Place each minced cutlet separately into the egg mixture and roll it in the crumbs. 

11. You need to eat Chicken Kiev cutlets immediately after cooking them. If you do not plan to eat them right away then put the cutlets in the fridge till dinner. 

12. Cook Chicken Kiev in hot oil (140 degrees Celsius) in a deep and a narrow pan. The cutlets should be covered with oil. Keep the cutlets inside for about 4-5 minutes. Use a skimmer to place the cutlets and remove from the oil. Make sure that they don’t become too brown. Don’t let water mix with the hot oil. 

13. Serve Chicken Kiev on top of croutons. 

14. Enjoy its secret inside! 

READ MORE: Here’s a delicious way to reinvent the famous ‘Veal Orloff’ with chicken (RECIPE)

If using any of Russia Beyond's content, partly or in full, always provide an active hyperlink to the original material.

We've got more than 1,8 million followers on Facebook. Join them!
Read more

This website uses cookies. Click here to find out more.

Accept cookies